An Evaluation of the Current US Technology Job Market

27 Dec 2004

After playing around a bit at Indeed, a new job posting aggregator currently in beta, I decided to use it's data to try out a job keyword search comparison for seemingly popular tech jobs. I just used a bunch of common words which I could think of to represent both languages and development platforms, both old and new. Some of the results might surprise you. If you can think of anything to add, let me know via the comments section!

DISCLAIMER: You obviously have to throw away the C, C++ and C# results as it looks like the ++ and # are being discarded as part of the search criteria. This is also not an exact science by any means obviously; it's just an interesting way (which has been done many times before using other vehicles) to evaluate the current openings in the US job market. I'll probably try running this test again sometime after the beginning of the new year as new budgets tend to add openings in the job market.

Programming Languages:

  • C: 79,711
  • C#: 79,711
  • C++: 79,711
  • Java: 44,195
  • .net (I suppose this sort of takes the place of c#): 40,060
  • Visual Basic: 15,948
  • Perl: 15,635
  • ASP: 14,560
  • VB: 9,711
  • 6,877
  • Cobol: 5,881
  • Flash: 5,543
  • PHP: 3,667
  • Python: 1,668
  • Cold Fusion: 1,651
  • ColdFusion: 1,461
  • Delphi: 850
  • ActionScript: 299


  • Windows (keep in mind this is a generic word.. there are contractor type jobs on this site too): 76,495
  • UNIX: 53,550
  • Linux: 18,634
  • Windows 2000: 18,389
  • Solaris: 15,665
  • Windows NT: 12,830
  • AIX: 7,138
  • Windows 2003: 6652
  • HP-UX: 3,204
  • Irix: 481
  • SCO: 344
  • FreeBSD: 236

So, as far as my opinion is concerned, here are a few interesting points which can be made from this data:

  • As primarily a ColdFusion developer at the present, I have to be glad I'm diversifying more into Java and other languages given the low number of CF jobs available. More jobs in Cobol than ColdFusion? Ouch! However, I think if you plan on being a good programmer, you need to have many tools at your disposal as sometimes you need a hammer, other times you need a rubber mallet. Being a one trick pony is a sure fire way to become more and more invaluable in the job market over a given period of time.

  • There are more Perl jobs than ASP or PHP.. interesting. Though, I'd imagine there are a lot of Sys Admin jobs which list Perl.

  • There are more Linux jobs than ones listed with Windows 2000 or Windows 2003? I find this to be extremely interesting and positive.